How Many Feats Can You Have in DND? (Solved)

In Dungeons & Dragons (DND), you get to customize your character with a unique mix of class, skills, abilities, and feats.

How many feats can you have in DND?

Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards all get 5 feats each at most at their max level. Rogues get 6 feats at most at max level, and fighters get 7 feats at most at max level. Variant humans get one extra feat at the first level.

In this article, you’ll learn everything you need to know about how many feats you can have in DND.

What Are Feats in DND?

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In Dungeons & Dragons, feats allow you to customize what your character can do.

You don’t have to choose a feat (it’s optional) but most players choose to take feats to fine-tune character abilities. These extra capabilities stack on top of basic traits and features that go along with their race and class.

According to the official Player’s Handbook, feats demonstrate:

“talent or an area of expertise that gives a character special capabilities. It embodies training, experience, and abilities beyond what a class provides.”

Every feat’s ability is unique, and you can grant your character either a movement speed increase, gain armor proficiencies, buffing up your damage, or gain the ability to use spells from a different class.

There are also half-feats that give you the option to increase your character’s Ability Score.

While some feats have requirements before you can get them, most don’t (Except for reaching a certain level in the game).

Since feats are an optional rule when playing D&D, it’s recommended to check with your Dungeon Master to see how they want to manage feats in their campaign.

How Many Feats Are There In DND?

As of writing, there are 78 total feats so far in the current edition of Dungeons & Dragons.

There are already 57 feats between the most commonly accepted sourcebooks, The Player’s Handbook and Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything.

In Xanathar’s Guide to Everything, there are 15 racial feats.

Wayfinder’s Guide, Draconic Options Unearthed Arcana and Eberron also have their own with 2 feats each.

Player’s Handbook Feat List

  • Alert
  • Athlete
  • Actor
  • Charger
  • Crossbow Expert
  • Defensive Duelist
  • Dual Wielder
  • Dungeon Delver
  • Durable
  • Elemental Adept
  • Grappler
  • Great Weapon Master
  • Healer
  • Heavily Armored
  • Heavy Armor Master
  • Inspiring Leader
  • Keen Mind
  • Lightly Armored
  • Linguist
  • Lucky
  • Mage Slayer
  • Magic Initiate
  • Martial Adept
  • Medium Armor Master
  • Mobile
  • Moderately Armored
  • Mounted Combatant
  • Observant
  • Polearm Master
  • Resilient
  • Ritual Caster
  • Savage Attacker
  • Sentinel
  • Sharpshooter
  • Shield Master
  • Skilled
  • Skulker
  • Spell Sniper
  • Tavern Brawler
  • Tough
  • War Caster
  • Weapon Master

Xanathar’s Guide to Everything Feat List

  • Bountiful Luck
  • Dragon Fear
  • Dragon Hide
  • Drow High Magic
  • Dwarven Fortitude
  • Elven Accuracy
  • Fade Away
  • Fey Teleportation
  • Flames of Phlegethos
  • Infernal Constitution
  • Orcish Fury
  • Prodigy
  • Second Chance
  • Squat Nimbleness
  • Wood Elf Magic

Tasha’s Cauldron of Everything Feat List

  • Artificer Initiate
  • Chef
  • Crusher
  • Eldritch Adept
  • Fey Touched
  • Fighting Initiate
  • Gunner
  • Metamagic Adept
  • Piercer
  • Poisoner
  • Shadow Touched
  • Skill Expert
  • Slasher
  • Telekinetic
  • Telepathic

Can You Take Multiple Feats?

Yes, you can take different feats at different levels depending on your race and class, but you are not allowed to take a feat more than once.

The exception is the Elemental Adept feat which you can take more than once.

That’s really cool because it means that mages can choose multiple types of elemental damage resistance to ignore.

So, if you’re party is going up against an ice giant or a fire ogre, your elemental mage has your back.

How Many Feats Can You Get in DND? (Max Number)

The number of feats you can get in DND falls somewhere between 0 and all of them. It all depends on a few things.

You never have to take a feat so the least amount is 0.

The easiest way to be able to take a feat is to level up. The first level where you will be able to gain a feat is when you reach level 4.

You get a choice.

You can either improve an Ability Score or choose to get a feat.

Different classes award Ability Score Improvements (ASIs) at different levels.

  • Most classes like Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards get ASIs at 4th, 8th, 12th, 16th, and 19th.
  • Rogues get ASIs at the 4th, 8th, 10th, 12th, 16th, and 19th levels.
  • Fighters get ASIs at the 4th, 6th, 8th, 12th, 14th, 16th, and 19th levels.

Remember that the only exception is a variant human, who automatically gets a feat when they start the game at the first level.

If your Dungeon Master (DM) lets you, you could build a feat tank character with all the feats.

Here is a good video about getting multiple feats in DND Feats:

YouTube video by Handbooker Helper: Feats – How many feats can you have in DND?

Can You Take Two Half-Feats?

Feats that grant a bonus of unique ability and give half of your Ability Score Improvement are known as Half-feats.

You can only take each half-feat only once unless the specific half-feat’s description allows you to take it twice. You may also decline to take one-half of the Ability Score Improvement in order to take a one half-feat of your choice.

Create a DND Character With Jasper ...
Create a DND Character With Jasper Art
Can You Take the Same Feats Twice?

According to the Player’s Handbook, “You can take each feat only once unless the feat’s description says otherwise.”

Therefore, most of the time the answer is No.

When the answer is Yes, the specific feat will spell it out clearly so that there is no confusion. But the most common correct answer is no.

As we mentioned earlier, one notable exception is the Elemental Adept feat for spellcasters.

How Many Feats Do You Get at Each Level?

Check out this chart that explains how many feats characters get at each level (1-20):

Levels 1-20CharacterFeat Counts
1Variant Human1 (All the rest have 0)
2Variant Human1 (All the rest have 0)
3Variant Human1 (All the rest have 0)
4Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters2, 1 (All the rest have one)
5Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters2, 1 (All the rest have one)
6Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters2 (3 if Fighter), 1 (All the rest)
7Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters2 (3 if Fighter), 1 (All the rest)
8Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters3 (4 if Fighter), 2 (All the rest)
9Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters3 (4 if Fighter), 2 (All the rest)
10Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters3 (4 if Fighter), 3 (Rogue), 2 (All the rest)
11Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters3 (4 if Fighter), 3 (Rogue), 2 (All the rest)
12Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters4 (5 if Fighter), 4 (Rogue), 3 (All the rest)
13Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters4 (5 if Fighter), 4 (Rogue), 3 (All the rest)
14Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters5 (6 if Fighter), 4 (Rogue), 3 (All the rest)
15Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters5 (6 if Fighter), 4 (Rogue), 3 (All the rest)
16Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters6 (7 if Fighter), 5 (Rogue), 4 (All the rest)
17Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters6 (7 if Fighter), 5 (Rogue), 4 (All the rest)
18Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters6 (7 if Fighter), 5 (Rogue), 4 (All the rest)
19Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters7 (8 if Fighter), 6 (Rogue), 5 (All the rest)
20Variant Human, Artificers, Barbarians, Bards, Clerics, Druids, Monks, Paladins, Rangers, Sorcerer, Warlock, and Wizards, Rouges, Fighters7 (8 if Fighter), 6 (Rogue), 5 (All the rest)
Chart: How many feats can you have in DND?

The chart spells it out clearly: If you want to max out your feats, play a variant human fighter.

How To Get More Feats in DND

In the current edition of D&D, there is only one direct and official path to getting feats: and that’s through leveling up.

However, you can ask your Dungeon Master to allow obtaining feats through:

  • Training
  • Using the Wish Spell
  • Getting help from a deity
  • Dungeon Master Homebrewing

Leveling Up

Keep in mind that you can level up with one character class or several classes.

You spread out leveling up by multiclassing (i.e., Fighter/Cleric).

That means you could, theoretically, gain feats for different classes at different levels. Once again, run all this by your DM first.

Otherwise, you might end up disappointed.

Training

All other options on how to get more feats will have to depend on your Dungeon Master, like training.

It’s recommended you talk to your Dungeon Master first if whether or not they allow this option to gain feats to be used before starting the game.

You can also let your characters spend their downtime training to master a feat.

But it can be very difficult and could take a long time to master a single feat.

To train for a feat, your character must spend at least 1500 days of downtime, or the days could depend on your Dungeon Master, and paying for at least a comfortable lifestyle for the whole duration.

Using the Wish Spell

In theory, you can wish for a feat, and it will be granted, but probably not in the most direct or helpful way as you intended it to be.

Wish spells notoriously go wrong.

But still, it would all depend on your Dungeon Master.

Help From a Deity

If your Dungeon Master allows it, you may be granted a feat from a deity if they choose your character to be their champion.

Usually, this only happens if your character significantly helps the deity in some way.

Dungeon Master Homebrewing

The Dungeon Master is one responsible for creating the adventure and controlling the game.

Therefore, they are the only ones who can decide whether or not they grant you feats in all other ways except for leveling up.

Dungeon Masters can choose any number of ways to grant a feat:

  • Defeating a major monster/enemy
  • Saving a large population of people
  • Completing a long campaign
  • Just because they feel generous

Final Thoughts

There’s no denying that adding a feat tank or two to your campaign would make it even more interesting.

It would make for an even more action-packed adventure.

An entire party of feat tank characters might be virtually unstoppable. Then again, it might prompt a malicious DM to go for a total party kill (TPK).

Related posts:

Sources

Wizards of the Coast
Player’s Handbook